6 Top Linux HTML Editors that Get The Job Done

May 25th, 2016No Comments

Deciding on the Linux HTML editor to work with is one of the most difficult decisions you will have to make in web design. There are dozens of editors available and for every good editor; there is one you would never want to waste time on again in the future. I spoke with an expert Linux based web designer Wesley from Cude Web Design in Surrey to get his views on the top HTML editors for Linux and we road tested 10 and whittled them down the list to the top 6 you should work with.

Komodo Edit

Komodo Edit

Komodo Edit is one of the best XML editors you can find today and it is free. It comes with a plethora of powerful features that come in handy in CSS and HTML development. There are also extensions you could use with it if you want to add languages or special characters. It is a decent all round solution for anyone building in XML. There is a high chance that this could become your go-to basic HTML editor.

Bluefish

Bluefish HTML Editor

Bluefish is a web editor for Linux that is completely full featured. You get autocomplete in different languages including HTML, PHP and CSS and the spell-check is code-sensitive. Snippets, project management and auto save are some other features you can find. Bluefish therefore offers a great deal of flexibility for web developers writing in other languages outside of HTML.

Screem

Screem

With Screem, you have a versatile XML editor and a versatile text web page editor. This editor recognises the Doctype you are working with and then fills tags on that premise. Unlike most Unix software, Screem comes with wizards and additional help. The way Screem handles the Doctype means you can use it to edit more than just HTML. If the language can be defined by a doctype, you can edit it in Screem

Brackets.io

Brackets.io

Brackets is one for designers. This modern text editor comes with focused visual tools and pre-processor support. It is lightweight, yet very powerful. It is in the same category with Screem in terms of amount of help provided as it has a plethora of visual tools that enhances the editing experience. The Creative Cloud Extract feature is one you will love if you need to generate clean, minimal CSS straight from a PSD without any generated code. With features being added nearly every month, it is one of the best supported Linux editors on this list.

SeaMonkey

SeaMonkey

SeaMonkey comes with a web browser, email and newsgroup client, IRC chat client, and the composer (which is the web page editor). It is Mozilla’s internet application suite, a complete all-rounder. The browser feature is an interesting addition because it simplifies the testing process. Additionally, the free visual editor with an embedded FTP makes it easy for you to publish to your web pages.

Notepad++

Notepad++

Notepad++ is a Notepad replacement editor that comes with most of the features you’d ordinarily miss while working with your standard text editor. As is the case with most text editors, this is not a web editor but it can be used to edit and maintain HTML. Using the XML plugin, you can check for XML errors pretty quickly. It also allows XHTML edit.

There you have it. With any of these editors, you can get the job done to varying degrees. Have you used any of these? Which ones are your best?

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